euphues:

1:02AM // It is again time for convalescence, I would tell my one true love, hoping he would remember that, one of our sweetest days — my next dentist appointment next week, just as it was this time last year, near or on that day in the park when I so boldly and proudly rested my head in his lap, something I had never been brave enough to do before. I love Samuel so completely, despite my past errors and stupidity. I understand his need to run away to play the bassoon, but I refuse to stop believing. I will always love him and believe in us. I understand him so very clearly, just as he sees me. <3 <3 <3

Reblogged from Hypergraphic Euphues

hobovampire:

Pooleaf

THIS WAS SO CUTE UNTIL I SAY THE NAME OF THIS AND NOW I AM lAUGHING SO HARD

Reblogged from Colored Mondays

ryanpanos:

Open House by Matthew Mazzotta

Artist Matthew Mazzotta, the Coleman Center for the Arts, and the people of York Alabama have teamed up to work together and transform a blighted property in York’s downtown into a new public art project in the shape of a house that can physically transform into a 100 seat open air theater, free for the public. The project called “Open House” was developed using materials from the abandoned house as well as the land it sits on. The house opens up when the community wants to enjoy shows, plays, movies, and any other event people can think of that supports community life.

Reblogged from ideas for cities
studio630:

3 Projects That Transform Highways Into Urban Oases
The phrase “the other side of the tracks,” connoting declining neighborhoods across from railroad lines, could easily translate to the community havoc wreaked by urban interstates. Noise, pollution, and walls of concrete can be more than a little off-putting. But new projects in cities around the world prove that freeways don’t necessarily have to be urban dead zones.


In places like San Francisco and Oakland, where earthquakes led to the replacement of several freeway stretches, interstates have been redesigned and upgraded into walkable, pleasant spaces. Other innovative approaches are showing how to transform the right-of-way land, overpasses, and adjacent spaces to be visually attractive assets—and even raise property values as businesses and residents move closer and begin to look at their infrastructure more favorably. In Seattle, Freeway Park includes space on both sides of I-5 and a green-covered pedestrian overpass connecting them, giving a convention center easy access to a large parking structure across the freeway. Shanghai’s dramatic light-sculpture installation on its freeway placed the road in a new visual context for residents, and dozens of examples have followed. Melbourne used art panels and artful sound barriers to enable development to move closer to the freeway. Houston’s Buffalo Bayou Park, located underneath an interstate, attracts thousands of annual visitors to festivals and events and is facilitating adjacent property-enhancement by private owners.


As for what’s next, Atlanta is at the forefront in transforming its much-maligned Connector and its adjacent spaces into a series of enhancement zones that reflect the surrounding neighborhood and will attract new economic energy, from a museum to a forested nature area and a pedestrian park. Together, these projects present a snapshot of how the highway of the future can be a boon, rather than a blight on, the urban fabric.
Written by: Kinder Baumgardner
via FastCoDesign

studio630:

3 Projects That Transform Highways Into Urban Oases

The phrase “the other side of the tracks,” connoting declining neighborhoods across from railroad lines, could easily translate to the community havoc wreaked by urban interstates. Noise, pollution, and walls of concrete can be more than a little off-putting. But new projects in cities around the world prove that freeways don’t necessarily have to be urban dead zones.

In places like San Francisco and Oakland, where earthquakes led to the replacement of several freeway stretches, interstates have been redesigned and upgraded into walkable, pleasant spaces. Other innovative approaches are showing how to transform the right-of-way land, overpasses, and adjacent spaces to be visually attractive assets—and even raise property values as businesses and residents move closer and begin to look at their infrastructure more favorably. In Seattle, Freeway Park includes space on both sides of I-5 and a green-covered pedestrian overpass connecting them, giving a convention center easy access to a large parking structure across the freeway. Shanghai’s dramatic light-sculpture installation on its freeway placed the road in a new visual context for residents, and dozens of examples have followed. Melbourne used art panels and artful sound barriers to enable development to move closer to the freeway. Houston’s Buffalo Bayou Park, located underneath an interstate, attracts thousands of annual visitors to festivals and events and is facilitating adjacent property-enhancement by private owners.

As for what’s next, Atlanta is at the forefront in transforming its much-maligned Connector and its adjacent spaces into a series of enhancement zones that reflect the surrounding neighborhood and will attract new economic energy, from a museum to a forested nature area and a pedestrian park. Together, these projects present a snapshot of how the highway of the future can be a boon, rather than a blight on, the urban fabric.

Written by

via FastCoDesign

Reblogged from ideas for cities
urbanination:

Park Hill Estate in Sheffield, before and after.  

urbanination:

Park Hill Estate in Sheffield, before and after.  

Reblogged from ideas for cities

kateoplis:

1930s Japanese Army headquarters turned Waterhouse | Neri & Hu

Reblogged from archi-tecture

designismymuse:

MAD architects: Absolute Towers in Mississauga, Canada (images, google)

Local Toronto residents have nicknamed the tower, “Marilyn Monroe”.

Reblogged from Eat me man!! Eat me!!
funknewsdelice:

The Fluid Space.

funknewsdelice:

The Fluid Space.

Reblogged from Eat me man!! Eat me!!
ffoto360:

Glasgow Riverside Museum

ffoto360:

Glasgow Riverside Museum

Reblogged from Eat me man!! Eat me!!

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